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When Can a Researcher Apply for a Green Card?

apply for a green card

There are many benefits to being a green card holder in the United States. Perhaps one of the most advantageous is working without restriction in any field or industry. If you are a researcher who has been offered a job in the United States, you may be wondering when you can apply for your green card. In this article, we will discuss the process for obtaining a green card as a researcher and provide some tips on making it happen!

How Can A Researcher Get A Green Card?

Scientists, professors, or other researchers who want to live and work permanently in the United States may be able to apply for a green card (permanent residence). To qualify, they must have an employer sponsor them and file an immigrant petition on their behalf.

The first step is for the researcher's employer to file a Labor Condition Application (LCA) with the U.S. Department of Labor. The LCA is used to establish that the wages and working conditions of the foreign worker will not adversely affect the working conditions of U.S. workers who are similarly employed.

Once the LCA is approved, the employer can file an immigrant petition (Form I-140) with U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). The petition must be accompanied by evidence that the researcher has the required academic or other qualifying credentials.

The researcher can then apply for a green card if the petition is approved. Although the process varies depending on the researcher's country of origin, most will need to go through consular processing. This involves an interview at a U.S. consulate or embassy. The applicant will be required to provide evidence that they meet all the eligibility requirements for a green card.

Once the green card is issued, the researcher can live and work permanently in the United States. They will also be able to apply for citizenship after five years if they meet all the requirements.

To properly understand the process, it's best to consult with an experienced immigration attorney. For instance, a well-versed Austin immigration law attorney can help ensure that everything is done correctly and that you are eligible for a green card as a researcher.

While L-1A and H-B visas are the most popular ways for foreign nationals of extraordinary ability in the sciences to come to the United States, the green card process is an alternative that may be a better fit for your particular situation. If you're interested in applying for a green card as a researcher, contact an experienced immigration attorney to learn more about your options and the best way to proceed.

What Are The Different Types of US Visa?

There are several different types of US visas, each with eligibility requirements and purpose. The most common type of visa is the tourist or business visa, which allows foreign nationals to enter the United States for a short period (usually up to six months) for business or pleasure. Other popular types of visas include student visas, work visas, and family visas.

If you are a non-immigrant who wants to live and work permanently in the United States, you need to apply for a green card. Green cards are also known as permanent resident cards. To qualify, you must have an employer sponsor you and file an immigrant petition on your behalf.

Visas non-immigrant can apply for includes:

  • M-1 visa for students in non-academic or vocational programs
  • F- visa for academic students
  • J- visa for exchange visitors
  • H- visa for workers
  • L- visa for intracompany transferees
  • O- visa for aliens with extraordinary ability in the sciences, arts, education, business, or athletics
  • P-visa for athletes, artists, and entertainers
  • R-visa for religious workers

There are other types of US visas, such as the E-visa for treaty traders and investors and the K-visa for fiancées of US citizens. Understanding which type of visa is right for you is essential to ensuring a successful application. An experienced immigration attorney can help you determine which type of visa is best suited for your needs and assist you in putting together a strong application.

Rate Of Getting Green Card For Scientists And Researchers

The rate of getting a green card for scientists and researchers is relatively high. In recent years, the number of L-visa petitions filed on behalf of scientists and researchers has increased dramatically. While several different factors contribute to this increase, it's likely due partly to the fact that more employers realize the benefits of hiring foreign nationals with extraordinary abilities in the sciences.

The L-visa is a non-immigrant visa that allows foreign nationals of extraordinary ability in the sciences to enter the United States for up to seven years. To qualify, applicants must have an employer sponsor them and file an immigrant petition on their behalf. The petition must be accompanied by evidence that the applicant has received a major internationally recognized award, such as the Nobel Prize, or that they have been published in a major scientific journal.

The H-visa is another non-immigrant visa that allows foreign nationals of extraordinary ability in the sciences to enter the United States. To qualify, applicants must have an employer sponsor them and file an immigrant petition on their behalf.

Final Words

Applying for a green card as a researcher is a complex process, but it can be well worth it for those who are eligible. If you think you might be eligible, contact an experienced immigration lawyer to learn more about your options and how to proceed.

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